All About Laser Hair Removal

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Laser hair removal removes the hair follicle and is a long-lasting method of hair removal. However, if the follicle is only damaged rather than killed during the laser hair removal procedure, the hair can regrow.

As a result, many clinicians now refer to laser hair removal as long-term rather than permanent hair removal.

Read through and learn more about how laser hair removal works, how long it lasts, and its costs.

How Does it Work?

Laser is used to penetrate the pigment in individual hairs in laser hair removal. The laser passes through the hair shaft and the hair follicle. The laser’s heat burns the hair follicle, making it impossible for a hair to emerge from it. To reverse effect, you can also try Laser Therapy in Bradenton.

Hair has a distinct growth cycle that includes periods of rest, shedding, and growth. Hair that has recently been removed and is in the resting period may not be visible to the technician or laser, so it might be necessary to wait until it regrows before removing it. Laser hair removal usually takes multiple treatments over four to six months for most people.

Is laser hair removal a long-term solution?

Laser hair removal from a follicle that has been destroyed is permanent. Laser hair removal removes a majority of the hair in a treated area but it is possible for hair growth to reoccur especially with hormonal changes and as you age. Hair regrowth will typically be lighter and thinner than prior to laser hair removal. People who have their hair removed should expect some hair to grow back in the treated region. It may even be possible to get rid of all hair in some cases.

Hair regrowth depends on various factors, including the type, texture, and quantity of hair that grows back. When hair regrows, most people note that it is lighter and less noticeable than before. This is because even though the laser fails to kill the hair follicle, it will cause harm to it. The hair will regrow if a hair follicle is damaged but not lost. Since it’s impossible to destroy every hair follicle, most people will see a hair loss of 80-90 percent. Hair may be treated again as it regrows, but people who want to remove all of their hair can need multiple treatments. Hair may be too light, too low, or resistant to treatment in some cases. So alternative or traditional hair removal methods, such as plucking stray hairs, may be used in these situations.

How long does laser hair removal last?

When the hair follicle is killed, laser hair removal is permanent. Hair will ultimately regrow if the hair follicle is just damaged and not destroyed. The length of time it takes for the hair to regrow is determined by the individual’s hair growth cycle. Hair grows faster in some individuals than it does in others. Hair in a resting period grows back more slowly than hair in a different phase. Within a few months, most people would expect to see some hair regrowth. They may then choose to have further removal procedures.

Is there a disparity in skin or hair color?

Hair removal works better for people who have dark hair and light skin. Because of the pigment contrast, the laser can target the hair, pass through the follicle, and kill the follicle more easily. Gray hairs cannot be treated as they are not detectable to the laser. People with dark skin or light hair may need more treatments and may notice that their hair regrows more quickly. To remove hair permanently, the correct dosage of power in the laser is important. More extended wavelength lasers perform best on dark skin, according to research published in 2013.

Risks and side effects

Some people feel pain, stinging, or irritation during treatment. With the DiolazeXL, there is a cooling mechanism that is built in which reduces any discomfort. The DiolazeXL Laser hair removal system also treats a larger area than traditional laser hair removal, which reduces treatment time.

Side effects are mild and include the following:

• Redness at the treatment site

• Swelling

• Stinging or burning sensation

Providing a thorough medical history and reviewing the risks and benefits with the physician will help the provider determine the best course of action, lowering the risk of severe side effects.

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